Career

A Word of Advice for College Seniors

September 22, 2015 in Alive Campus, Career

The Job Quest for Millennials

The Job Quest for Millennials

One of the burning questions we consistently ask ourselves throughout our senior year is whether or not we will be able to successfully enter the working world. We’ve pulled countless all-nighters to finish that paper and study for that ridiculously hard final, yet there’s no guarantee that we will be rewarded for our hard work. We’ve interned, worked part-time jobs, held decent grades, and still, we’re still unsure of where all of this exhausting work will lead us. The real question is, why is finding a job so difficult for college grads?

About 35 percent of the average American holds a Bachelors’ degree, and that’s only increasing with time. Naturally, there has become an increased competition rate for entry-level positions that all seniors desperately seek upon graduating. Unfortunately, it’s not as easy to find a job as the time of our parents’ generation, where an Associate’s degree was plenty. We, as millennials, have been challenged for our skills, defined as lazy, told we’re not team players or hard workers, and the list goes on. However, what some companies may not recognize is that we are the generation who is most technologically proficient, which is essentially what all companies are turning to in regards to work. Some companies have moved to only working digitally since it’ progressively becoming the dominant method through which we complete tasks. After all, it’s efficient and speedy, so it makes the most sense.

I think there are a number of reasons why the job process has become nothing short of arduous for recent graduates. To name just a few, there’s the problem with not having experience, more students overall searching for jobs, the need for particular degrees to fit a certain position, lack of connections, lack of job openings, etc. The truth is, you may spend months or even close to a year searching for an entry-level position. I think one of the biggest words of advice I can provide is to never give up the search, no matter how many times you receive a rejection email. Those are bound to happen more often than not. While I am not in that position myself, I have watched close friends search up to a year to finally land a job related to their future career. The unfortunate truth is that you oftentimes need to have connections to even be considered for an interview. That’s why interning is key in college, but this still does not necessarily guarantee a job after you graduate. Another issue is that several companies also seek to hire people with experience in the field. How, though, how can we have experience if these companies never give us the initial chance to start?

Job Search

Job Search

It’s evidently difficult for people who haven’t experienced it to really know how current college students and graduates worry about their future. 83 percent of college students do not have a job lined up before graduation, despite their active search through various career sites, attending job fairs, etc. Finding a job is so demanding and exhausting, yet we’re still criticized for being lazy. As a senior who graduates in just 7 months, I have been asking myself the question more than ever. What happens when I graduate? Unfortunately, I don’t have all the answers, but I like to tell myself it will all unfold properly in the end. If we can get through a difficult 4 plus years of college, then we can certainly get through the long and frustrating process of job searching. Tackle it just like you did that biology final, and you’ll eventually be rewarded in time.

What You Need to Know About Her Campus

August 7, 2015 in Alive Campus, Career, Reviews

Her Campus

Her Campus

What is a collegiette? Well according to Her Campus, a collegiette is “a college woman who is on top of her game – strategically career-minded, distinctly fashionable, socially connected, academically driven, and smartly health-conscious, who endeavors to get the most out of her college experience on every level.” With over 6,000 contributing college journalists worldwide, Her Campus aims to develop digital articles related to topics of interest on HerCampus.com

Starting out as just an idea, Her Campus was founded by three undergraduate Harvard students, Stephanie Kaplan Lewis, Windsor Hanger Western, and Annie Wang. Now, with over 270 campus chapters nationwide and in seven countries, HerCampus.com develops original story ideas and features national style, beauty, health, career, LGBTQ+, love life, and real world content.

One very interesting feature offered at Her Campus is the Campus Correspondents. A Her Campus chapter is specific to your school and includes features, blogs, campus celebrities, campus cuties, snapshot, and events. This allows readers from your college or university to relate to the content produced, which in this case is specific to your school. Students wanting to start a campus chapter at their school must apply online in order to be considered. If you are selected to lead the Her Campus chapter at your school, you have the opportunity to attend the Her Conference each summer where you meet with members of over 270 chapters around the world.

Her Campus Blog Post

Her Campus Blog Post

HerCampus.com also offers other services including the “Study Break” E-Newsletter, College Fashion Week, and Her Conference: High School. Reaching the inboxes of over 118,000 subscribers three times a week, the content delivered through the newsletter connects readers to the collegiettes of Her Campus. For example, Contiki’s #NoRegrets philosophy was promoted through the newsletter inspiring readers to be bold and adventurous. The College Fashion Week program, now in its fourth year, is a series of fashion show events throughout the fall. The marketing opportunities available through this service allow Her Campus writers to introduce products such as bareMinerals and TRESEmmé to their target audience. The Her Conference: High School offers up and coming writers and collegiettes the opportunity to attend nationwide events and engage in panels, workshops, and networking receptions with other young women like themselves. Her Campus also has a blogger network online and Survival Kits Sampling Programs providing essential products to help students survive college.

Interested in writing for HerCampus.com? To be considered as a National Contributing Writer, students must fill out an application form online. Most national sections are filled by undergrads, but college alumni are eligible to apply for the Real World sectionIn order to be considered as a writer for a campus chapter, your schools correspondent must be contacted directly. Information on your schools Campus Correspondent can be found online through HerCampus.com.

Her Campus is currently hiring for full-time positions in New York City and Boston, Mass. Positions include Vice President of Sales in NYC or Boston, Sales & Business Development Manager in NYC or Boston, Business Development Assistant, Account Executive, Editor, and Web Developer in Boston.For more information about Her Campus, visit hercampus.com, or connect with them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

The Internship Quest

June 24, 2015 in Alive Campus, Career

This summer, I have been lucky enough to experience my first office internship in New York City. I am currently working as a fashion and home intern for Woman’s Day Magazine, doing miscellaneous tasks very similar to that of an editor. I commute to the famous Hearst Tower every day by Metro North train and work a full 9 hours. From what I’ve accomplished so far these past six weeks, I can certainly vouch that internships are key components to your college experience in order to gain an insight as to what it’s like to work in your field of study. It may ultimately lead you into being hired post-graduation if you work hard enough and make solid connections. Or, it may turn you away from the job you thought you had always wanted. Luckily, for me, it’s only made me more interested in eventually working in publishing. Here are some beneficial tips to know prior to your internship search:

Application Process: The cover letter is always huge factor in showing why you specifically are cut out for this internship. If you’re applying for a writing position, talk about your previous work and why it’s benefited you as a writer and a worker. Make sure your resume is clean and straightforward, considering companies do not have the time to read through thousands of intricate applications. If this is your first internship and you have no prior experience, simply talk about your skills and the classes you have taken in school.

Interview: I was able to do a phone interview for my internship since I attend school in Florida and rarely come home throughout the semester. While these are becoming more and more common, they are still just as important as far as making an impression. It’s always a good idea to have notes laid out in front of you for any questions that may be asked, and always be sure to have background information about the company for any unexpected questions. Showing that you’re interested in the company and have immersed yourself in background knowledge of it is extremely important.

You’re Hired!: This is the most exciting news you can receive after all that hard work. If the company decides to hire you, make sure you thoroughly explain to them all of the school requirements if you plan to get credit for the internship.  Several internships, such as mine, are unpaid if you are receiving school credit. In order to make up for it, I work on weekends at a restaurant. While it may be difficult to not receive any form of solitary compensation for your hard work, just remember that internships will provide you with an amazing experience that gets your foot in the door. DO NOT turn it down if it is unpaid. This is a common mistake that several students make when they realize they will not be paid for the internship. In a situation like this, experience conquers money.

The Internship: Once you have the internship, I’ve learned thus far that going above and beyond is extremely important in order to make an impression. There are so many students that intern at major companies, so naturally, it’s easy to forget some interns. Stand out by showing up early every day or leaving later, and even check emails while at home if you’re set up on the company email account. It demonstrates responsibility and a huge interest in bettering the company as a whole. Keep a positive attitude while on the job and always do what your boss asks no matter how exhausted you may be, because there will certainly be days that seem never ending. However, a recommendation from your boss is what will ultimately lead you into being hired down the road. Remember that you need to start somewhere to reach the top!

In the end, the internship usually turns out to be one of your best college experiences. There will be tough days on the job and easy days, just like that of the real world. Work hard during the application process, and don’t stress over the possibility of not being hired. It happens to the best of us, so keep applying and you will eventually be accepted somewhere. Good luck in your internship search!

Hearst Tower

Hearst Tower

Finding the Right School for You

May 29, 2015 in Academics, Admissions, Alive Campus, Campus Life, Career, Colleges

You now what’s crazy? You graduate from high school, barely 18 and you’re expected to know exactly what you want to do with your life and where you want to go. Yeah, that makes sense. If you graduate from high school and are planning to attend college, there are so many decisions that you have to make. It isn’t easy, but luckily there are some resources out there for you to make you “life defining” decision.

Decisions, Decisions!

Decisions, Decisions!

1. Collegeboard.com: I used this site a lot when I was looking for colleges because it gives you a breakdown of each school from the ratio of boys to girls to the price. It’s fairly easy to navigate, and it allows you to see which college is best for you. This is especially useful if price is a big factor for you, because they are fairly accurate and you can compare the prices of each college that you are thinking about attending. Another perk is that this site gives the acceptance rate, which can save you some money from applying to schools that may be out of your league.

2. Guidance counselor: For me, my guidance counselor was very helpful in my search and helped me narrow down my choices. It’s best to find a counselor that is realistic in your search so that they don’t give you any high hopes for schools that aren’t a good fit. If you talk to your guidance counselor about your interests and everything that you’re looking for, they should have enough experience to help you find the right school. They can also connect you with other students that are in the same situation so that you can talk with them and get some extra advice.

3. Studentsreview.com: This site wasn’t so helpful for me, as much as it’s a sort of complaint center for people who weren’t happy in college at all. I made the mistake of visiting this site before I attended my school, and was scared off a little bit. Basically it’s like every other review site – people only leave reviews when they are bitter and rarely leave them when they are content. Most of the reviews on this site are about how certain schools have no parties etc. While some of the things said were a bit true, they hardly reflected the entirety of the school that I chose. I could tell that whoever wrote them must have been more unhappy with themselves and their own lives more than anything.

4. Word of Mouth: This is probably the best way to start your college search, or at least that’s my opinion. I didn’t even know about the college that I chose until I was talking with someone who went there. After hearing them talk about the college, I looked it up and ended up being really interested. If I had never talked to that person, I wouldn’t have even known that the college existed. Just because a college doesn’t have a huge name or isn’t well known, doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s not the right place for you. Try talking to older siblings or your friends older siblings that are currently in college to help narrow down your search.

The most important thing to remember when looking for a college is to stick to your gut and make the best decision for yourself. Don’t go to a school because all of your friends say it’s the best “party school” and don’t go to a school in Boston just because you think the city is cool. Once you visit the right college for you, you’ll just know it. Weigh all of your options, and don’t forget to do what’s best for you! Good Luck!

Goodbye Alive Campus (and Thank You)

May 22, 2015 in Alive Campus, Campus Life, Career, Colleges

It has been exactly one week since I graduated from college and I have to say, that I am still not use to the idea of being a graduate. I will no longer have to go to school and attend classes after the end of a long summer, since I have decided not to attend graduate school for the time being. I will dedicate my time to working and see what path and opportunities arise. Now, another ending is happening. This is the last article I will post for Alivecampus. After two years of writing weekly articles, it has come to an end. I have decided that it is time to focus on other opportunities, but through alive campus I have learned a lot of useful skills needed in a job and life: time management, creativity, and writing skills.

AliveCampus

Time Management: Once a week, I had to write an article, plus write and/or post questions on the forum, aside from doing homework/studying for my classes. It can be stresses full to balance two things at the same time, but it is manageable through time management. I am thankful for Alivecampus to help me develop skills of time management. Before, I was not very good at being able to balance work evenly and not leave work to the last minutes. Even though I still procrastinate from time to time, I have a better way of managing my work and time to get work done on time.

Creativity:  This is a skill that I had a difficult time developing, but by writing the articles every week, it helped me think about different topics. Especially when the question for the week’s article was in the theme of Alivecampus, which meant that I could write about anything about being a college student and what concerns me. The creativity followed me to not only through the articles, but with the weekly forum posts we had to get done. Writing, answering, and replying to questions in the forum helped me be creative with the questions I was posting. It also helped me connect with other college students and see that we have similar questions, concerns, and interests.

Writing Skills:  My number one skill that I am grateful for Alivecampus to help me develop is my writing skills. English is not my first language, so I have always not been confident about my writing skills. Yet, though Alivecampus, I was able to express my thoughts and improve my writing. I feel that throughout these two years of being an advocate writer at Alivecampus, I have improved my writing.

I would like to thank Alivecampus for giving me the opportunity to improve my writing skills and to express and share my college experience for others to read.  Alivecampus is a wonderful website to have because it helps college students and high school seniors know about the myths of college and read real experience of real college students. Once again, thank you Alivecampus and thank you Radek!

I will definitely miss writing and posting weekly articles!