A Word of Advice for College Seniors

September 22, 2015 in Alive Campus, Career

The Job Quest for Millennials

The Job Quest for Millennials

One of the burning questions we consistently ask ourselves throughout our senior year is whether or not we will be able to successfully enter the working world. We’ve pulled countless all-nighters to finish that paper and study for that ridiculously hard final, yet there’s no guarantee that we will be rewarded for our hard work. We’ve interned, worked part-time jobs, held decent grades, and still, we’re still unsure of where all of this exhausting work will lead us. The real question is, why is finding a job so difficult for college grads?

About 35 percent of the average American holds a Bachelors’ degree, and that’s only increasing with time. Naturally, there has become an increased competition rate for entry-level positions that all seniors desperately seek upon graduating. Unfortunately, it’s not as easy to find a job as the time of our parents’ generation, where an Associate’s degree was plenty. We, as millennials, have been challenged for our skills, defined as lazy, told we’re not team players or hard workers, and the list goes on. However, what some companies may not recognize is that we are the generation who is most technologically proficient, which is essentially what all companies are turning to in regards to work. Some companies have moved to only working digitally since it’ progressively becoming the dominant method through which we complete tasks. After all, it’s efficient and speedy, so it makes the most sense.

I think there are a number of reasons why the job process has become nothing short of arduous for recent graduates. To name just a few, there’s the problem with not having experience, more students overall searching for jobs, the need for particular degrees to fit a certain position, lack of connections, lack of job openings, etc. The truth is, you may spend months or even close to a year searching for an entry-level position. I think one of the biggest words of advice I can provide is to never give up the search, no matter how many times you receive a rejection email. Those are bound to happen more often than not. While I am not in that position myself, I have watched close friends search up to a year to finally land a job related to their future career. The unfortunate truth is that you oftentimes need to have connections to even be considered for an interview. That’s why interning is key in college, but this still does not necessarily guarantee a job after you graduate. Another issue is that several companies also seek to hire people with experience in the field. How, though, how can we have experience if these companies never give us the initial chance to start?

Job Search

Job Search

It’s evidently difficult for people who haven’t experienced it to really know how current college students and graduates worry about their future. 83 percent of college students do not have a job lined up before graduation, despite their active search through various career sites, attending job fairs, etc. Finding a job is so demanding and exhausting, yet we’re still criticized for being lazy. As a senior who graduates in just 7 months, I have been asking myself the question more than ever. What happens when I graduate? Unfortunately, I don’t have all the answers, but I like to tell myself it will all unfold properly in the end. If we can get through a difficult 4 plus years of college, then we can certainly get through the long and frustrating process of job searching. Tackle it just like you did that biology final, and you’ll eventually be rewarded in time.

Controversial Issues at Florida State

September 14, 2015 in Alive Campus, Campus Life

A number of controversial issues can be found at every university. At Florida State, there are so many students attending that it’s nearly impossible to not have topics up for debate. There are a few issues in particular that have been stirring for the past few years. The biggest and most recent one is the question of whether or not guns should be allowed on the campus. There are so many sides to this argument that it needs to be examined in full detail.

Almost a year ago, there was a shooting at FSU’s main library, in which we were lucky enough to have escaped with no fatalities excluding the gunman. However, three students were seriously wounded because they were unable to protect themselves. After this situation, the question arose of whether or not students should be allowed to carry concealed weapons on campus as a form of protection. While no laws have been passed approving this notion, there is still debate as to whether it not it will improve campus safety, or if it will only increase threats. The argument lies in the idea that innocent, unarmed students have no way of saving themselves if more situations occur like the one in the library.

As of right now, students with valid permits are only allowed to leave guns locked in their cars during football games, which is something that has only recently been approved. It is still not acceptable for students to carry concealed weapons across campus. In my personal opinion, the idea that several students could be walking the campus carrying a concealed weapon is more dangerous than not, and therefore should not be permitted, Although students should certainly have the right to protect themselves, the more that possess guns, the higher chance of more tragic situations occurring. For example, if a student is drunk on campus, stressed over finals, fighting, or whatever the case, a weapon may become their go-to. These weapons are not things that should be taken lightly. If the campus wants students to have more protection, then security should be increased instead. Police officers and security guards should be the only armed individuals on campus, being that they are trained and know to use them in only dire situations.

The Prevention of Hazing

The Prevention of Hazing

Another controversial issue that occurs at FSU deals with Greek life. While I will not name any organizations in particular, it’s a known fact that some of the sororities and fraternities oftentimes participate in hazing during rush and initiation week. This is something that I do not agree with. These organizations are meant to accept you as a person and make you feel as if you have become a member of a small family. Therefore, placing these students in uncomfortable and sometimes very dangerous situations is not how to make them feel “at home.” I think greater prevention measures need to be taken in order for hazing to be completely avoided at all costs. There is currently a site dedicated to this issue, which FSU pledges that hazing should never be utilized. This is certainly a step in the right direction. However, more needs to be done to ensure it never occurs. There are so many situations in which students are desperate to be initiated as members of an organization that they never reveal what their initiation tasks consisted of, even if they were life-threatening. Unfortunately, it leaves too many organizations to do things that are often left unsaid.

So with these two issues stirring at FSU, I think it’s important that everyone provides their opinion on the matters and acts upon them. Controversial issues will always take a while to be resolved, but it is ultimately up to us to make a difference.

The Typical Day of a Seminole

September 7, 2015 in Alive Campus, Campus Life

The typical day of a college student varies significantly. Some work, others are members of several clubs on campus, others intern, and some may just strictly focus on classes if they are in a difficult major. A typical day in college for me is certainly a busy one. With Tuesday/ Thursday classes only, I keep my schedule open to work my part-time job as a waitress at a popular local sports bar. I completed my required internship over the summer so classes, working, interning, and attending club meetings wouldn’t be too overwhelming all in one semester. My three classes, twice a week, go straight through from 9:30 to 1:45. I wake up around 8 to give myself time to have coffee and eat breakfast. Some days, I may even wake up earlier to do some homework or study before walking to class. Once I complete my classes for the day, I walk home to my apartment, eat lunch, and get ready for work, which usually starts sometime between 3:30 and 5. I usually work until about 10, depending on how busy the night is at the restaurant. I then drive home, eat dinner, and unwind at home by doing some homework if needed, or simply reading a book to fall asleep. I also take an online course, so I make time for that either at night or on my days off.

I organize my schedule so I can work and attend class all in the same day. By doing so, I can have a full day off to take care of homework, grocery shopping, seeing friends, etc. These are usually on Mondays and Wednesdays. On my free days, I’ll either go to the pool with friends or simply relax at home while doing work on and off. With a busy schedule, I sometimes cook all of my food in advance for the week ahead so I’m not constantly buying food out. I keep my evenings open for meetings, specifically for Her Campus- a known organization that has its own FSU chapter. If there is no meeting to attend, I catch up or get a headstart on my homework for the week, which usually consists of several pages of reading, papers, and blogging. I also make time on my days off to exercise, which totals about four times a week.

Time management is key in college!

Time management is key in college!

Finally, my weekends always vary. Since I work in a restaurant, it’s important that I’m available to work almost every Friday and Saturday night. However, depending on my shift, I sometimes will be done early enough to go out with friends afterwards. Unfortunately, that’s a commitment you have to make and plan your schedule around if you want to work as a server. If I have the mornings or afternoons off, I am always making sure to attend the football games- a fall tradition that makes you wish every day was Saturday throughout the semester.

It’s important to stay busy and productive throughout college to build your resume, but always find the time to relax no matter how crazy your schedule may be. Sometimes, there’s just not enough time in a day to get everything done. That’s what weekends are for. Days will always vary according to your agenda and how much work you have. Some weeks will be entirely exhausting, while others will be more relaxing. A great idea is to write yourself notes each day of the tasks you need to complete so it’s all planned out already. It’s all about time management and knowing how to balance free time with productivity.

Activities for the Budget-Conscious Seminole

August 30, 2015 in Alive Campus

The typical saying that college students often cry poor is not far from true. Between tuition, books, and groceries, the majority of us don’t have as much spending money leftover as we’d like.  Since this is the case, it’s always ideal to find hobbies that won’t become a huge hit to your wallet. Here are some low-cost activity suggestions for my fellow Seminoles:

Student Life Cinema: Attending a movie at the SLC conveniently located on campus is completely free of charge for students. It mostly shows both recent and popular movies, so you won’t be disappointed in the selection.

Crenshaw Lanes

Crenshaw Lanes

The Res: For those who enjoy outdoor activities, the Res is a great pastime on weekends. Only about a 10-minute drive from campus, it offers students rentals on both kayaks and paddleboards for just $1 with a valid FSU ID. There’s also the option of playing beach volleyball or simply laying on the sand.

Crenshaw Lanes Bowling: The bowling alley located in the center of the student union is ideal for those who want to perfect their bowling skills. The prices change depending on the day, but it’s never more than 3 dollars. Some days it’s bowl one, get one game free. Others it’s free shoes, and some it’s just one dollar to bowl a game for the entire day. Always check online for the updates on pricing.

Sporting Events: The sporting events at FSU are no charge for students. Fall season is always the most exciting for the football games and tailgating, so be sure to keep a Saturday open to cheer on the Seminoles in Doak Campbell Stadium.

Lake Ella: On a nice day, several students will go out for a picnic and enjoy the weather while sitting on the beautiful Lake Ella.  Surrounded by fountains and benches for visitors to relax, it’s the perfect low-cost and relaxing activity for a Sunday afternoon.

Tallahassee Museum: Only 10 minutes away from campus, the Tallahassee Museum has many activities to offer. Take advantage of the nature trails and all of the beautiful scenery.

Student Organizations: FSU offers students over 500 clubs and organizations. If you do enough research, you’ll be sure to find one that’s low in cost to join and the right fit for you. It’s an awesome way to get involved and meet new friends that share similar interests.

Tallahassee Museum

Tallahassee Museum

Wakulla Springs: Tallahassee is hot mostly year round, so cooling off in Wakulla is a great way to escape college stress and relax on a Saturday. You can also hike along the trails if you’re feeling adventurous.

Governor’s Square Movie Theater: This movie theater is located right next to the mall and gives students discounts on all movie tickets, whether it’s a matinee showing or at nighttime. If you’re dying to see a new movie coming out, you don’t have to worry about spending a lot. It’s only $7 on a weeknight and $9 on a weekend night if you show your ID.

Be sure to take advantage of these low-cost activities during your time at FSU, especially at the end of the semester when a package of ramen seems too expensive to afford. Always be sure to check in on the FSU site for the latest events going on around campus, especially during homecoming week when free concerts at held at the stadium and Civic Center.

How To Spend Your School Vacations Right!

August 28, 2015 in Campus Life, Travel

College Spring Break

College Spring Break

Like most college students, University of Rhode Island Rams are excited for spring break, Thanksgiving break, and just about any excuse to have off from school. Most students will travel home during breaks, but some will choose to travel with their friends. At URI, students usually travel to Mexico for spring break or even Florida (if they’re over 21). Whatever the destination may be, traveling during breaks seems to be a must. In addition to the destination, transportation is just as important. Please be reminded that URI is in the middle of nowhere and is sometimes a hassle to travel to and from. This is true for a lot of universities therefore planning ahead of time is really important. There’s nothing worse than getting stuck with a horrible seat or even traveling at an unreasonable time because you waited too long to book your traveling arrangements.

This spring break, students will be traveling to Mexico (most likely) with other college students. This includes students from URI, but also from 10-20 other colleges and universities. From personal experience, if you have not had the opportunity to go on one of these spring break trips…DO IT! You won’t ever get the chance to sit by the beach with hundreds of other college students, soak up the sun, and drink yourself into a week of unforgettable memories. It’s not always fun and games, but if you go with a good group of people and are there to enjoy yourself (be prepared to get five hours of sleep total), you’ll have a blast.

Habitat for Humanity Alternative Spring Break

Habitat for Humanity Alternative Spring Break

There is also an alternative spring break option for most students at colleges and universities, which I do not think is taken advantage of. Sometimes programs like Habitat for Humanity host alternative spring breaks where they bring groups of students to areas around the United States and build homes and/or schools for underprivileged families and communities. I think this traveling option is productive and a great way to get involved in and around the community. Besides, if you choose to travel somewhere else in the US, you won’t technically be going home. Isn’t that what school vacations are all about?

For other students who are just traveling home for breaks, make sure you purchase your plane, train, or bus tickets in advance. I’ve heard of people waiting until the last minute to purchase tickets and they’ve either missed out on going home or have had to pay a ridiculous amount of money just to get home. Know your exam/work schedule well in advanced in order to book your tickets. Luckily for us Rhody Rams, the Amtrak is a five minute drive from campus. These trains go to just about anywhere and are a convenient way to travel home. Public buses area also available on campus and travel to the city of Providence multiple times a day. The best piece of advice I have for students trying to travel home during breaks, is to book their tickets and reservations a few weeks or even months ahead!

Traveling while your in college is a great time to explore and learn about yourself and others. As much as I encourage people to study abroad, if some are unable to, traveling during school vacations is a great idea. We are lucky enough to have breaks that range from two weeks to five weeks during Christmas time, therefore we must take advantage of it all. Whether its going to Florida and having some fun at pool parties or going to Cancun with the rest of your university, traveling during breaks is a great idea and should be enjoyed by all college students!