college

What You Need to Know About Her Campus

August 7, 2015 in Alive Campus, Career, Reviews

Her Campus

Her Campus

What is a collegiette? Well according to Her Campus, a collegiette is “a college woman who is on top of her game – strategically career-minded, distinctly fashionable, socially connected, academically driven, and smartly health-conscious, who endeavors to get the most out of her college experience on every level.” With over 6,000 contributing college journalists worldwide, Her Campus aims to develop digital articles related to topics of interest on HerCampus.com

Starting out as just an idea, Her Campus was founded by three undergraduate Harvard students, Stephanie Kaplan Lewis, Windsor Hanger Western, and Annie Wang. Now, with over 270 campus chapters nationwide and in seven countries, HerCampus.com develops original story ideas and features national style, beauty, health, career, LGBTQ+, love life, and real world content.

One very interesting feature offered at Her Campus is the Campus Correspondents. A Her Campus chapter is specific to your school and includes features, blogs, campus celebrities, campus cuties, snapshot, and events. This allows readers from your college or university to relate to the content produced, which in this case is specific to your school. Students wanting to start a campus chapter at their school must apply online in order to be considered. If you are selected to lead the Her Campus chapter at your school, you have the opportunity to attend the Her Conference each summer where you meet with members of over 270 chapters around the world.

Her Campus Blog Post

Her Campus Blog Post

HerCampus.com also offers other services including the “Study Break” E-Newsletter, College Fashion Week, and Her Conference: High School. Reaching the inboxes of over 118,000 subscribers three times a week, the content delivered through the newsletter connects readers to the collegiettes of Her Campus. For example, Contiki’s #NoRegrets philosophy was promoted through the newsletter inspiring readers to be bold and adventurous. The College Fashion Week program, now in its fourth year, is a series of fashion show events throughout the fall. The marketing opportunities available through this service allow Her Campus writers to introduce products such as bareMinerals and TRESEmmé to their target audience. The Her Conference: High School offers up and coming writers and collegiettes the opportunity to attend nationwide events and engage in panels, workshops, and networking receptions with other young women like themselves. Her Campus also has a blogger network online and Survival Kits Sampling Programs providing essential products to help students survive college.

Interested in writing for HerCampus.com? To be considered as a National Contributing Writer, students must fill out an application form online. Most national sections are filled by undergrads, but college alumni are eligible to apply for the Real World sectionIn order to be considered as a writer for a campus chapter, your schools correspondent must be contacted directly. Information on your schools Campus Correspondent can be found online through HerCampus.com.

Her Campus is currently hiring for full-time positions in New York City and Boston, Mass. Positions include Vice President of Sales in NYC or Boston, Sales & Business Development Manager in NYC or Boston, Business Development Assistant, Account Executive, Editor, and Web Developer in Boston.For more information about Her Campus, visit hercampus.com, or connect with them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

A Stylist’s Guide to the University of Rhode Island

July 17, 2015 in Campus Life, Colleges

Students at URI

Students at URI

Ever wanted to wear leather leggings but felt like they didn’t reflect your style? How about that pair of pastel colored pants you saw, but thought they were too bright for you? Luckily for college students, going to school is a freeing experience for a couple of different reasons. People aren’t worried about your style anymore and whether or not you choose to dress up or down every day is your decision. The University of Rhode Island is home to 15,000 undergraduates who all have different styles ranging from preppy and chic to comfortable and cozy.

From the freshmen boy who can’t seem to get out of bed early enough to take his pajamas off to the sophomore girl that matches her shirt perfectly to the stitching on her shoes. Not to mention the junior boy who has the same Ralph Lauren collared shirt in every color imaginable and the senior girl who’s head is spinning so fast from the night before that she’s forgotten she’s still carrying her heels and walking barefoot out of her house. URI has it all.

Don’t sweat it! Students at the University of Rhode Island are not classified according to their look or fashion sense. Although, there are a few fashion trends you’ll see among certain groups of students. From example athletes generally dress the same because of their daily schedule. If these players aren’t out on the field or in a swimming pool training, they’re probably on their way to the gym. Most athletes will dress in URI gear or their teams practice uniforms. Definitely a comfortable yet athletic look.

Another group of students that have fairly the same taste are members of Greek life. A lot of fraternity brothers can be seen in pastel colored clothes, boat shoes, and ray band sunglasses. Nothing against their fashion sense, but they all generally look the same. For some of the more athletic fraternities, they get away with sweat pants, basketball shorts, and work out t-shirt. Guys will be guys so whatever they choose to dress in, they’ll make sure to be comfortable in as well.

Ladies are not an exception to Greek life fashion trends at URI. Most sorority sisters have a Tobi dress, a pair of converse, and some sort of backless shirt in their closet. Tobi is a popular website where a lot of girls get clothing from at a reasonable price. They offer crop tops, jean shorts, dresses, and even accessories on their site. A pair of converse because let’s just face it, no girl could go through Greek week and socials without them and a backless shirt for those bar nights.

Whatever your fashion sense may be, the University of Rhode Island welcomes and encourages them all. Other students involved in organizations such as theater may use more dramatic costume designs in their style. Foreign exchanged students may come to URI and wear a traditional outfit from their culture. If there is one piece of advice I have for students trying to figure out what to wear, it’s to always check your weather app before stepping outside. Let that be your stylist guide to the University of Rhode Island!

Video: Studying in College

July 2, 2015 in Campus Life


Erika Rumbold on Studying in College

How Much Do You Actually Learn in College?

June 5, 2015 in Academics, Alive Campus, Campus Life

This week I was asked to write an opinion piece about some aspect of college, which was surprisingly hard to come up with. As I tried to reflect back on my time in college I thought of a million things to write about, but the hard part was narrowing it down to one thing. Finally it came to me – what is the whole point of college? For me personally I went to college to learn, not just to get a job. My whole life I have enjoyed being in school, so it made sense to go to college to learn even more and to eventually get a degree so that I could get a higher paying job. So, I ask myself…what did I actually learn in college? Does the price tag accurately reflect how much knowledge and experience that students come out of college with?

learning?

learning?

Of course, I am reflecting on my own experience, so other kids in college could have a completely different view or opinion. For me personally, college disappointed me in some ways. I thought that because I was going to a private, small, liberal arts college that every single one of my classes would be challenging, interesting and amazing all at once. This was certainly not the case. I remember taking classes like The Bible, Elementary functions, Ethics, History of Music etc. and thinking that they were a complete waste of time. It wasn’t even that the classes were boring or hard or anything, it was that they had the potential to be good classes and they just weren’t. Whether it was the professor’s teaching style, the people in the class, or the chosen material, these classes straight up sucked.

I realized that the one thing that these classes had in common was that they lost me in the beginning and then it was all downhill from there. Once you get a bad taste of something are you going to continue to want more? On the other hand, I took classes that completely intrigued me and kept my attention even after the lecture was over. All of these classes are the ones that I learned from and still remember things from. To be honest, they weren’t even classes that I thought I would be interested in at all. To name a few – corporate finance, creative writing, anthropology, sociology, media analysis, ethics etc. were all classes that I distinctly remember learning a ton in.

I think the amount and extent by which you learn obviously has a lot to do with your specific interests, but I don’t think that it ends there. I think that your surroundings and particular environment really lends a hand to the classes you remember and those that you don’t. If your professor is always using real examples and seems to really care, you’re probably going to learn a lot. If you have a washed up, ready to retire professor that rambles on about nothing it’s not doing you any good. If you’re in a class of slackers who are constantly bargaining on due dates with the professor I think that it affects your attitude about the class.

My overall point of this is that college may disappoint you, but it’s important to not become discouraged. You will sign up for classes that you think you’ll learn a lot in and you will come to find that you haven’t learned as much as you thought you would. But, for every class that you take that disappoints you, there will be one that pleasantly surprises you. Also, you can’t really measure how much you learn just by your classes. I think that if you graduate college as a better person than when you entered, it’s a good sign that you learned a good amount. So there you have it, my opinion of learning in college.

Finding the Right School for You

May 29, 2015 in Academics, Admissions, Alive Campus, Campus Life, Career, Colleges

You now what’s crazy? You graduate from high school, barely 18 and you’re expected to know exactly what you want to do with your life and where you want to go. Yeah, that makes sense. If you graduate from high school and are planning to attend college, there are so many decisions that you have to make. It isn’t easy, but luckily there are some resources out there for you to make you “life defining” decision.

Decisions, Decisions!

Decisions, Decisions!

1. Collegeboard.com: I used this site a lot when I was looking for colleges because it gives you a breakdown of each school from the ratio of boys to girls to the price. It’s fairly easy to navigate, and it allows you to see which college is best for you. This is especially useful if price is a big factor for you, because they are fairly accurate and you can compare the prices of each college that you are thinking about attending. Another perk is that this site gives the acceptance rate, which can save you some money from applying to schools that may be out of your league.

2. Guidance counselor: For me, my guidance counselor was very helpful in my search and helped me narrow down my choices. It’s best to find a counselor that is realistic in your search so that they don’t give you any high hopes for schools that aren’t a good fit. If you talk to your guidance counselor about your interests and everything that you’re looking for, they should have enough experience to help you find the right school. They can also connect you with other students that are in the same situation so that you can talk with them and get some extra advice.

3. Studentsreview.com: This site wasn’t so helpful for me, as much as it’s a sort of complaint center for people who weren’t happy in college at all. I made the mistake of visiting this site before I attended my school, and was scared off a little bit. Basically it’s like every other review site – people only leave reviews when they are bitter and rarely leave them when they are content. Most of the reviews on this site are about how certain schools have no parties etc. While some of the things said were a bit true, they hardly reflected the entirety of the school that I chose. I could tell that whoever wrote them must have been more unhappy with themselves and their own lives more than anything.

4. Word of Mouth: This is probably the best way to start your college search, or at least that’s my opinion. I didn’t even know about the college that I chose until I was talking with someone who went there. After hearing them talk about the college, I looked it up and ended up being really interested. If I had never talked to that person, I wouldn’t have even known that the college existed. Just because a college doesn’t have a huge name or isn’t well known, doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s not the right place for you. Try talking to older siblings or your friends older siblings that are currently in college to help narrow down your search.

The most important thing to remember when looking for a college is to stick to your gut and make the best decision for yourself. Don’t go to a school because all of your friends say it’s the best “party school” and don’t go to a school in Boston just because you think the city is cool. Once you visit the right college for you, you’ll just know it. Weigh all of your options, and don’t forget to do what’s best for you! Good Luck!